Fit to Print

“Wild” web pages, WikiLeaks, and all that jazz— Pace faculty have been out and about in the press this month.

Art professor Jillian Mcdonald’s website was highlighted as one of “The Wildest Faculty Web Pages” in The Chronicle of Higher Education.; and in Border Crossings, a Canadian arts magazine, she discussed her increasingly celebrated fascination with zombies, vampires, and horror films.

Nicholas Catalano, PhD, a professor of English, is a contributor to All About Jazz. His latest essay links to past and current practitioners of jazz who use the contrapuntal lines of classical music.

Darren Hayes, DPS, Seidenberg’s computer forensics and security expert, has been repeatedly quoted about the implications of the WikiLeaks controversy, most recently in a Flint Journal article about a possible lack of open access to social networking sites and e-mail for troops abroad.

Anthony D. Mancini, PhD, co-authored research that found that for many, losing a job has “few long term psychological effects.” Multiple media reported on the study.

In an op-ed in the Journal News on the conviction of White Plains Mayor Adam Bradley, Pace Law Professor Bennett L. Gershman, JD, strongly suggested Bradley resigns.

Pace Law’s John Nolon, JD, was interviewed on an influential public radio station, WAMC, after the Pace Land Use Law Center presented ideas for rehabilitating the city’s economy at a hearing in Newburgh.

New business founders should “suspend their confidence in their own business” and listen to customers, advised Professor and Director of Entrepreneurship Bruce Bachenheimer in the second of two segments on MSNBC’s “Your Business.” Additionally Bachenheimer discussed innovations of the year in his second appearance on a worldwide Voice of America (VOA) news program.

Jackson Morris, a senior policy adviser at the Pace Law School’s Energy and Climate Center, talked to American Public Media’s Marketplace about new EPA regulations on greenhouse gas emissions at power plants, refineries, and paper mills.

Chris Williams, an environmental activist and adjunct professor, is “an informative and engaging writer, but his biggest weapon is his thorough research” according to a review in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer.