Equality Can’t Wait

New York City is electing its first new Mayor in 12 years. It’s time to make sure NYC’s next leader puts equality at the top of the agenda. Hear from the candidates on the issues that impact women and girls, and on matters that affect every New Yorker.

On Tuesday, May 7, Pace University and the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies once again join forces with the National Organization for Women’s New York City chapter (NOW-NYC) to host a debate between the top candidates in the upcoming New York mayoral election. The event, “Equality Can’t Wait: NOW-NYC Mayoral Forum,” is meant to ensure that the next mayor of New York City puts equality at the top of his or her agenda.

“NOW approached us and asked if we would host a mayoral candidates’ debate that would focus specifically on issues of interest to women in the upcoming mayoral elections,” explains the Chair of Women’s and Gender Studies department Nancy Reagin, PhD. “We thought that it would be really interesting for our students as well as the community.”

At 7:00 p.m. the candidates of New York City’s mayoral race will take to the Schimmel stage for two back-to-back town hall style debates. The first features Democrats Christine Quinn, Bill de Blasio, John Liu, and Bill Thompson, while the second debate includes Republicans John Catsimatidis, Joe Lhota, and Independent candidate Adolfo Carrión Jr.  The debates will be moderated by former New York Times political writer, Joyce Purnick, winner of the Peter Kihss Award for reporting on city government and the Front Page Award for her political column in New York Magazine and author of Mike Bloomberg: Money, Power, Politics. Up for discussion are issues such as equal pay, parental leave, and other issues of workplace equity that the city has a role in regulating and determining.

“We’re hoping for a big turnout from the Pace Community. We’re sure the topics will be of interest to students from all colleges, including Women’s and Gender Studies, Political Science, and Communication students,” Reagin says.

For more information and to register, please visit www.nownyc.org.

1 thought on “Equality Can’t Wait”

  1. “NOW approached us and asked if we would host a mayoral candidates’ debate that would focus specifically on issues of interest to women in the upcoming mayoral elections,” explains the Chair of Women’s and Gender Studies department Nancy Reagin, PhD.

    And what about debates that focus on issues of interest to men? Doesn’t equality apply to men as well?

    Why are so many men dropping out of high school and college in such large numbers? Why are men more likely to be unemployed and homeless?

    Why are men more likely to be refused much-needed government services when compared to women?

    Why are men more likely to be the victims of violent crimes and more likely to be murdered when compared to women?

    Why are men more likely to be denied visitation with their children? Why do we have a fatherless America?

    Why are men 4 times more likely to commit suicide when compared to women?

    Why are there so many scholarships, grants, internships, workshops, job-training courses, seminars, classes and recruiting programs geared towards women but not men?

    Why are there so many fund-raising and awareness programs for breast cancer research when prostrate cancer kills at least as many men as breast cancer kills women and testicular cancer kills a lot of men as well?

    Why are men more likely to be injured and even killed in workplace accidents?

    Why are male victims of sexual assault not given the same support and access to resources as female victims of sexual assault are?

    Why are men more likely to be arrested, convicted and sent to prison for crimes they did not commit?

    Why are men more likely to be penalized when they decide to reduce their work hours to take care of family needs?

    Why are women more likely to divorce stay-at-home dads?

    Will these issues be discussed at all? So much for equality.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.