President’s Corner

Last week I had the pleasure of attending the dedication of Ottinger Hall at Pace Law School. It was a wonderful occasion, honoring former Dean Dick Ottinger for his special place in Pace history… At Commencement we will have the opportunity to celebrate another major figure in the history of Pace, Neil Bianco ’61, who will be stepping down as Chair of the Pace Board of Trustees.

President's CornerDear Colleagues,

Last week I had the pleasure of attending the dedication of Ottinger Hall at Pace Law School. It was a warm and wonderful occasion, honoring former Dean Dick Ottinger for his special place in Pace history as a seminal leader and devoted mentor to 30 years of Pace Law School students. As I said in my prepared remarks, “I cannot think of a better tribute to Dick than renaming the classroom building in his honor. And I cannot think of a more inspiring name for the building that brings together our students and faculty in a community of learning.”

At the 2013 Commencement we will have the opportunity to celebrate another major figure in the history of Pace, Neil Bianco ’61, who will be stepping down as Chair of the Pace Board of Trustees. As a Pace alumnus, Neil has experienced the power of Opportunitas in his own life and he has worked tirelessly to extend that opportunity to new generations of Pace students. He has served as a Trustee for more than 40 years.  During a chairmanship that spanned 14 years and 3 Pace presidents, he has also attended every Commencement, where he confers the degrees on our graduates.  I look forward to sharing the stage with him as he performs this official duty one final time.

I hope you will be able to attend at least one of our Commencements as either as a volunteer or as a spectator.  If you cannot attend the ceremonies in person, you can watch them online at the Pace website. It is an honor to spend this very special day with our graduates and their families.

Thank you for all you are doing to make this another wonderful spring at Pace.

Sincerely yours,

Stephen J. Friedman

President’s Corner

Just like the natural world in spring time, the rich diversity of Pace life is on full display during the month of April. In addition to the teaching and learning that enliven our days, the University will host an exciting roster of intellectual, cultural, and community offerings.

President's CornerDear Colleagues,

Just like the natural world in spring time, the rich diversity of Pace life is on full display during the month of April. In addition to the teaching and learning that enliven our days, the University will host an exciting roster of intellectual, cultural, and community offerings, including the Dyson Day Conference, featuring Anant Awargal, president of the groundbreaking Harvard-MIT Online Consortium edX; Pace Presents performances by the ABT Studio Company and world-renowned jazz trumpeter Hugh Masekela; InsideTrack with Pace alumnus and Trustee Thomas Quinlan, President and CEO of RR Donnelley; and the annual President’s Scholarship dinner celebrating the generosity of our alumni and friends. In what the poet William Wordsworth would call “a thousand splendid notes,” these busy April days express the Pace Community’s highest priorities and deepest values—intellectual challenge, the exchange of ideas, creative excellence and connection through the arts, and the enduring devotion of one Pace generation to the next.

Of course there is a great deal more happening across our campuses than I can mention in one column, so be sure to review the University calendar here: www.pace.edu/events. In spring, we are often reminded to stop and smell the flowers. These are indeed busy days, but I hope you will take a moment to stop and enjoy the abundance that is available to you as a member of this community of learning.

Sincerely yours,

Stephen J. Friedman

President’s Corner

Nearly fifty years ago, Pace opened the gates of a new campus in Pleasantville and an exciting new chapter in its continuing evolution. From its earliest days, the Pleasantville Campus radiated the spirit of Opportunitas as individuals seized upon the chance to experience a Pace education in the rolling Westchester countryside.

Dear Colleagues,

Nearly fifty years ago, Pace opened the gates of a new campus in Pleasantville and an exciting new chapter in its continuing evolution. From its earliest days, the Pleasantville campus radiated the spirit of Opportunitas as individuals seized upon the chance to experience a Pace education in the rolling Westchester countryside. Exceeding its enrollment goals, the Pleasantville campus welcomed a freshman class of 143 day students, including many women, and 265 evening students, who were already employed by a remarkable 100 companies. Arriving at a campus that was still an active construction site, these Pace pioneers often joked about driving over dirt roads in the morning and heading home over blacktop at night.  “The furious pace of construction,” wrote the author of Opportunitas, the History of Pace University, “was a sure sign that the college was an institution on the move.”

Today, Pace and the Pleasantville Campus are once again on the move. We are preparing to launch a transformative campus renewal plan that will position Pleasantville for the 21st Century and we are looking forward to a year-long celebration of the 50th anniversary of the campus. Spearheading the 50th anniversary celebration is a committee of more than 35 representatives from all areas of University. Under the leadership of University Relations, the 50th Anniversary Celebration Planning Committee, and a host of subcommittees, are meeting regularly to develop an exciting array of events, academic panels, athletic competitions, films, and other media to recognize the many wonderful contributions of Pleasantville to Pace University and the surrounding Westchester community. The 50th anniversary celebrations will kick off at Convocation in September and continue throughout the 2013–14 academic year.

The fundamental purpose of Pace has remained constant since 1906: to prepare students from all backgrounds to succeed in their professions and lives. The celebration of the Pleasantville Campus reminds us that our mission transcends city, countryside, or century, responding to the dreams of promising young people everywhere.

Sincerely yours,

Stephen J. Friedman

President’s Corner

During the winter break, my wife Fredi and I visited Cuba for the first time on a trip conducted by the Metropolitan Museum of Art; there is an exception to the U.S. embargo rules for educational visits, and many organizations sponsor them. Like many Americans, I knew comparatively little about Cuban society and its economy.

President's CornerDear Colleagues,

During the winter break, my wife Fredi and I visited Cuba for the first time on a trip conducted by the Metropolitan Museum of Art; there is an exception to the U.S. embargo rules for educational visits, and many organizations sponsor them. Like many Americans, I knew comparatively little about Cuban society and its economy. In the event, it was one of the most interesting weeks I have spent in recent years.

Day after day, I learned something fascinating about the history, customs, people, and economy of this beautiful, complex, and beset island nation. The historical architecture of Havana is stunning, filled with beautiful 18th and 19th Century buildings reflecting the Spanish empire in the New World—stunning but crumbling. Cuba is perhaps the most pure version of a classic Communist economy in the world today; until just a few years ago, everyone worked for the state (and most still do) for salaries that differ little according to what job or function you perform and are inadequate for most middle class people. Many of the most well off people in Cuba are artists, who are both well-educated and trained and can sell their work abroad.

There has been a crazy quilt of rules founded in Communist ideology that illustrate how hard it is to run a country with a centrally planned economy. In 1960 the new government decreed that everyone owned the apartment in which they lived—but nobody owned the apartment building itself, and, to avoid “profiting” no one could sell their apartment. Until a few years ago, one could only trade an apartment or house for another.

Through all this, and through the bitter and prolonged collapse of their economy after the withdrawal of the very large Soviet sugar subsidy in 1991, the Cuban people appear to a visitor to be stalwart, charming, and happy—perhaps not with the uncertainty about their future but with life in general. Young people are an exception; they are leaving Cuba in droves because it is unclear where the new government is headed in economic and political liberalization and they cannot discern the shape of their future.

I returned home with not only a wealth of new knowledge but with a reminder of the enormous satisfactions of life-long learning and intellectual curiosity, habits we strive to foster in all of our students. In a 2011 study called “The Hungry Mind,” psychology researchers found that intellectual curiosity constituted a major predictor of student achievement, declaring it the “third pillar,” along with intelligence and conscientiousness, of academic performance. It is also an important predictor of professional success—and satisfaction. It is an important part of a life well lived.

I hope you enjoyed your winter break and I look forward to working with each of you to make 2013 a wonderful year for Pace University.

Sincerely yours,

Stephen J. Friedman

President’s Corner

As 2012 draws to a close, it is tempting to look back at the year that was and recount all of Pace’s highlights and achievements. Such an endeavor, however, would take far more space than I am allotted here, so I am going to focus my reflections on the remarkable month that was November 2012 because it was filled with so many moments of pride for our University.

President's CornerDear Colleagues,

As 2012 draws to a close, it is tempting to look back at the year that was and recount all of Pace’s highlights and achievements. Such an endeavor, however, would take far more space than I am allotted here, so I am going to focus my reflections on the remarkable month that was November 2012 because it was filled with so many moments of pride for our University.

Let me begin with our outstanding undergraduate economics team, which placed first in the New York Federal Reserve College Challenge and then third at the national competition in Washington, DC. This was a terrific achievement and a proud moment for these students, their talented, and dedicated faculty coaches—Gregory Colman, associate professor of economics, Mark Weinstock, lecturer in economics, and Anna Shostya, assistant professor of economics—and the University as a whole. The Pace economics team demonstrated all you can accomplish when you find your passion, seek mastery of your subject, and work together to achieve a collective goal. Indeed, to top off its first place finish in the New York competition, the team also received the Lloyd Bromberg Teamwork Award.

While we celebrated the success of our students and faculty, others took notice as well. Just a few days after our team’s success, we welcomed to campus William C. Dudley, president of the New York Federal Reserve, for the latest edition of InsideTrack. Before he began his prepared remarks, President Dudley made a spontaneous pitch to the Pace students in the audience, urging them to come work at the New York Fed. One of the most powerful and influential figures in American economic circles, President Dudley knows the power of a Pace education. He has seen it in action, working with and leading some of the hundreds of Pace alumni who have worked at the Fed over the years.

Pace alumni are known for their depth of knowledge and their ability to get a job done. We help them gain these skills in the classroom and through our thriving internship program. This real-world work experience is a hallmark of the Pace education, and it is something that we are becoming increasingly known for within higher education and by the general public. In November, U.S. News and World Report highlighted our excellence in this area, naming our internship program fifth in the nation.

Another hallmark of the Pace education is our commitment to civic engagement. This was recently given vivid expression when NYPD Officer and Pace graduate Larry DePrimo ’09 gave a homeless, shoeless man in Times Square a pair of boots and warm socks. This simple act of kindness and compassion captured the hearts of people throughout our city and across the nation. We take pride in knowing that it also captured the great character and personal initiative of the Pace Community.

While all of these wonderful moments happened in a single month, they exemplify the enduring Pace spirit and the excellence that we all strive for throughout the year. Thank you for your spirit, your excellence, and your commitment to Pace University.

You have my best wishes for a happy and healthy holiday season.

Sincerely,

Stephen J. Friedman

President’s Corner

I am so proud of the way the whole Pace Community pulled together and deeply grateful for all of your contributions…the great caring and meticulous attention to detail exercised, and the resilience and creativity of the faculty in dealing with the many challenges to the academic experience.

President's CornerDear Colleagues,

While the past two weeks have been extremely challenging ones for the University and for many members of our community, they have also been filled with examples of great courage, determination, and kindness—and even good humor.

I am so proud of the way the whole Pace Community pulled together and deeply grateful for all of your contributions—the very long hours worked by those in Buildings and Grounds, Security, ITS, Student Assistance, University Relations, and many others; the great caring and meticulous attention to detail exercised by the deans for students in New York City and Pleasantville; and the resilience and creativity of the faculty in dealing with the many challenges to the academic experience. We can all take great pride in the way our students stepped forward to help others.

It seems somehow fitting that this week we celebrate Pace employees who have served this university for 20, 30, 40, even 50 years. These are individuals like Allan Rabinowitz, a graduate of Pace, who joined the Lubin School of Business in 1962. How much stronger we are as a community because of colleagues like Allan, who have dedicated so much of their professional lives to Pace and who hold the history of this university in their hearts. I am so proud to be a member of a community that inspires such loyalty and affection, and I thank you for all you do for Pace.

Sincerely,

Stephen J. Friedman

President’s Corner

Every year Homecoming gives us an opportunity to welcome alumni back to Pace and celebrate this university, which plays such an important role in all of our lives. Pace is very much our professional home; it is the place where we spend our days and it is a community to which we belong.

President's CornerDear Colleagues,

Every year Homecoming gives us an opportunity to welcome alumni back to Pace and celebrate this university, which plays such an important role in all of our lives. Pace is very much our professional home; it is the place where we spend our days and it is a community to which we belong. Today, Pace is making significant progress on a wide range of “home improvement” projects designed to revitalize our campuses, advance our mission of Opportunitas, and enhance our relationships with our students and one another. These include new academic buildings like 140 William Street, which supports our flourishing performing arts program; new residence halls that will begin opening next year in Lower Manhattan; attractive upgrades, like the Dyson Labs in Pleasantville; and the regulatory approval of an ambitious master plan for the Pleasantville Campus.

While we continue to work hard on improving our home, I hope you will also join in on the fun of Homecoming 2012. Whether you are an employee of Pace, or an alumnus as well, you are welcome to attend the festivities in New York City on October 25–27 and Pleasantville on November 1–4. In Pleasantville, you can watch the student parade, cheer on the football team as they take on Stonehill College, and enjoy Homecoming dinner with colleagues and friends. The schedule for New York City Homecoming is still unfolding, but you can register and keep up with the details on the Homecoming website at www.pace.edu/homecoming.

More and more Pace is becoming a true destination school—a home—for students who are looking for a dynamic location and innovative academic programs. I thank you for all you are doing to move Pace in this important direction, and I look forward to seeing you at Homecoming!

Sincerely yours,
Stephen J. Friedman

President’s Corner

As we begin a new academic year, let us be inspired by the example of the “Original Pace Man,” reaffirm our own devotion to this enterprise, and be reminded that students remain at the heart of everything we do. Let us follow Homer Pace’s lead and consider what each of us can do to make the Pace experience the best it can be for all Pace men and women.

President's Corner

Dear Colleagues,

One of the first students to enroll in the fledgling Pace Institute, as our university was known in its early days, was a young man named James F. Hughes. Of humble origins, Hughes attended public school and worked as a clerk in several organizations before deciding to stake his future on the field of accounting. He enrolled at Pace and never looked back, going on to a stellar career that included serving as president of both the New Jersey and New York associations of Certified Public Accountants and establishing his own accounting firm, Boyce, Hughes and Farrell at 70 Pine Street, right here in Lower Manhattan.

Hughes was known as “the Original Pace Man” and in many ways he continues to exemplify the Pace man and woman of today. He came to Pace determined to create a better life and he graduated with the tools he needed to succeed in his profession. But, like today’s students, Hughes was something still more. He was a thinking professional. Although Pace did not then offer the liberal arts program that we have today, Homer Pace was determined that his school should produce well-rounded individuals, so he supplemented his curriculum with pamphlets and articles that he wrote on “Cultural Reading,” “Character Building,” “Productive Use of Personal Time,” and exploring subjects like the relationship between the individual and the modern business world.

In the early part of the twentieth century, students like James Hughes were able to transform their lives because Homer Pace, Charles Pace, and many others were devoted to this enterprise. Homer Pace was always thinking about how to improve the Pace education and make the Pace experience the best it could be for all Pace men and women.  He cared deeply about his students and he kept up with many of them throughout their lives. He wrote often to Hughes, chronicling the triumphs and setbacks of the Institute, and providing advice and insights to his former student, whom he called “the most loyal fellow in the world”.

As we begin a new academic year, let us be inspired by the example of the “Original Pace Man,” reaffirm our own devotion to this enterprise, and be reminded that students remain at the heart of everything we do. Let us follow Homer Pace’s lead and consider what each of us can do to make the Pace experience the best it can be for all Pace men and women.

Sincerely yours,
Stephen J. Friedman

President’s Corner

The motto of the Olympic Games—Faster, Higher, Stronger—has inspired generations of athletes from around the world in their passionate pursuit of excellence. As we prepare for the start of another school year, let us set for ourselves a similar quest and pursue excellence in all that we do.

President's CornerDear Colleagues,

The motto of the Olympic Games—Faster, Higher, Stronger—has inspired generations of athletes from around the world in their passionate pursuit of excellence. Whether it is Michael Phelps becoming the most decorated Olympian ever or Jordyn Wieber rallying from individual disappointment to help her team win gymnastics gold, the 2012 Summer Olympics have offered us examples of excellence that are not only thrilling to behold, but can serve to motivate our own lives.

Like the athletes themselves, the Olympic motto inspires with its vigor, with language that is questing rather than fixed.  Indeed, it is not Fast, High, and Strong but Faster, Higher, Stronger. As we prepare for the start of another school year, let us set for ourselves a similar quest and pursue excellence in all that we do. This pursuit will not only enliven our day-to-day experience, it will help us advance Pace University and our mission of Opportunitas, which is so important in the world today.

In a few short weeks, we will welcome the Class of 2016 to Pace. During Convocation, I plan to share with our newest students a few pieces of time-tested advice, the first of which is to “seek mastery.”  Mastery, I will tell them, means committing yourself to something more than just getting by. It means experiencing the excitement of developing deep understanding, doing your best, and reaping the rewards—be they intellectual, physical, spiritual, or financial. All of us who work at Pace can feel this same excitement when we commit to doing more than just getting by, when we commit to the passionate pursuit of excellence.

It is a further delight to celebrate the excellence of others. In the year ahead, let us make sure to acknowledge our colleagues when they go above and beyond and recognize one another whenever we see a job well done.

Thank you for all that you do to advance Pace as an institution of excellence. I hope you have been enjoying a happy and relaxing summer and I wish you an exciting new school year!

Sincerely,
Stephen J. Friedman

President’s Corner

As you begin planning for the year ahead, think about the kind of skills, knowledge, and experience you would like to acquire.Talk to one another about your strengths, areas of interest, and opportunities for improvement.

President's CornerDear Colleagues,

During Commencement, I shared with our newest graduates an image that I have always found inspiring. Imagine that your life is like a giant oak tree. You start out at ground level and travel up the trunk. As you move higher, you encounter more and more branches. Some may represent a turning point in your career and others just a new set of experiences. The advice I gave the Class of 2012 was, “don’t let too many of those branches go by.” Climb out on a few of them. Each will help you gain new skills and new knowledge, and meet new people.

Summer is the perfect time for each of us to try out a new branch as well. As you begin planning for the year ahead, think about the kind of skills, knowledge, and experience you would like to acquire. If you are a manager, think about the skills you would like your team to develop, and consider how you can make their Pace experience even more stimulating and satisfying. Talk to one another about your strengths, areas of interest, and opportunities for improvement. Over the summer, Pace’s Human Resources Department will hold a number of seminars devoted Professional Skills and Performance Management, including customer service training, resolving conflict with peers, goal setting, leading meetings, correcting performance problems, and public speaking. Try one and see if it leads to a growth experience for you.

This issue of Opportunitas features a profile of Pace rising junior Kristie Dash, winner of our Success Stories Starts Here contest. As a Pace student, Kristie is living her Pace experience to the fullest, achieving a 3.9 GPA, pursuing internships in fashion and entertainment, holding down a campus job, and writing in her own blog. In her winning submission, Kristie wrote that last summer, “I really focused on preparing an amazing schedule for my sophomore fall semester.” This summer, think about your own “amazing schedule” and where it can take you.

Thank you for all you have done to make FY11–12 such a successful one for Pace. I am confident that FY12–13 will be even better!

Sincerely,
Stephen J. Friedman

President’s Corner

As I write this note, we are heading straight into Commencement season, with all of the anticipation and the swirl of preparations that keep us on our toes and, from time to time, up at night as well. I know this year’s Commencement festivities will be beautiful, inspiring, and heartfelt—just as they are every year.

President's CornerDear Colleagues,

As I write this note, we are heading straight into Commencement season, with all of the anticipation and the swirl of preparations that keep us on our toes and, from time to time, up at night as well. I know this year’s Commencement festivities will be beautiful, inspiring, and heartfelt—just as they are every year.

Pace has enjoyed a century’s worth of commencements and yet each one feels fresh and new because of the excitement of our graduates, the evident pride of their families, and the changing times that provide a historical backdrop for each occasion. The Class of 2012 faces the prospect of a still-recovering economy, and other serious challenges at home and abroad, but I feel confident in their futures, knowing that their professors have prepared them well to succeed in their professions and in their lives. For ample evidence, we need look no further than the alumni who return to campus at this time of year. They represent the impressive stock from which today’s students spring, and they remind us of the enduring ties that bind the Pace generations together.

As faculty and staff, we become accustomed to the rhythms and rituals of the school year that culminate with Commencement. For some, the summer means welcoming a new crop of students. For others, it provides extra time to devote to research and writing. For still others, it means taking stock of the year that was and planning for the year ahead. For all of us, I suspect, it brings far less down time than we anticipate and moves much more swiftly into the fall than we imagine! I do hope everyone is planning to take some much-deserved time off to enjoy with family and friends.

Over the next few weeks, I will be recording my thoughts about various Commencement activities on my blog. I invite you will visit and share your impressions as well. Thank you for all you do to make the Commencement season so special for our graduates and their families

Sincerely,
Stephen J. Friedman

President’s Corner

Over the past month, I have been reminded again and again of the qualitative elements that make Pace such a special place—the care and compassion of our community, the loyalty we feel toward this University and its important mission, and the pleasure we take in celebrating the successes of our colleagues.

President's CornerDear Colleagues,

In my last column for Opportunitas, I wrote about Pace’s new advertising campaign, which highlights points of pride across the University. Many of these pride points are easily quantified—our 34 Fulbright recipients, for example, or our internship program’s ranking among the top 10 in the nation. Over the past month, however, I have been reminded again and again of the qualitative elements that make Pace such a special place—the care and compassion of our community, the loyalty we feel toward this University and its important mission, and the pleasure we take in celebrating the successes of our colleagues.

At the very moving dedication of the clock tower in memory of DJ Henry, I witnessed the Pace family gathering together to embrace the Henry family with affection and respect. At an alumni event in Boca Raton, Florida, I talked with graduates who said that Pace gave them the opportunity they needed to succeed in this world, and I saw the powerful role that faculty play in keeping alumni engaged with the University. At the recent employee recognition events in New York City and Pleasantville, and earlier in White Plains, I had the fun of joining with you to recognize the excellence of Pace faculty and staff. Indeed, when we are excellent, Pace is excellent—whether that excellence can be measured in rankings and statistics or is simply understood by everyone who comes in contact with the Pace Community.

One of the best parts about my job is that I get to see these remarkable moments as they happen across the University. I want to make sure that you know they are happening too, so I will be writing about them in my blog for faculty and staff. I re-launched the blog in earnest a few weeks ago, and I am committed to using this important tool to communicate with you about a wide range of topics. I hope you will drop by and, as always, I invite your comments and feedback.

Thank you for all you do to make Pace such a special place. Thank you for making Pace, Pace.

Sincerely yours,

Stephen J. Friedman
President

President’s Corner

As faculty and staff, we know that Pace is a special place… We want the world to know what we know about Pace. To that end, we recently launched an exciting new advertising campaign that will spotlight points of pride across the University. Over the next three months of intensive enrollment activities, Pace ads will appear in the print and online versions of national and local news outlets.

Dear Colleagues,

As faculty and staff, we know that Pace is a special place. We see this university’s outstanding qualities every day—in our talented community, innovative balance of liberal arts and professional education, and high achieving alumni, who are leading at every level of the professions. I am sure we have all had the experience, however, of speaking to friends or acquaintances and discovering that they don’t know what we know—that Pace can boast 34 Fulbright recipients, for example, or that our Performing Arts program gives students the opportunity to perform on Broadway while they are attending Pace, or that our internship program was named one of the top 10 in the nation.

We want the world to know what we know about Pace. To that end, we recently launched an exciting new advertising campaign that will spotlight points of pride across the University. Over the next three months of intensive enrollment activities, Pace ads will appear in the print and online versions of national and local news outlets, including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Post, and The Westchester Journal News. You will also see these ads on posters throughout our campuses. Our goal is threefold: to increase overall awareness, generate favorable opinions, and attract even more outstanding students to Pace.

To provide greater depth on the pride points highlighted in the ads, the campaign also features a companion website called Success Starts Here, which presents profiles of interesting and accomplished Pace students, faculty, and alumni: www.pace.edu/success-stories.  I encourage everyone to spend some time reading through these stories, which will be refreshed on a regular basis. (You are welcome to submit story ideas to Susan Kayne at skayne@pace.edu.) Individually and collectively, they paint a beautiful portrait of Pace.

I am delighted to thank Susan Kayne, Marie Toulantis, and the University Relations team for spearheading this important effort. Every day is a great day to tell the world about Pace!

Sincerely yours,

Stephen J. Friedman
President

President’s Corner

President Barack Obama recently announced his Blueprint for Keeping College Affordable and Within Reach for All Americans. While I have some concern that the plan risks ignoring the great range of contributions colleges and universities make to students’ lives, I share President Obama’s conviction that we must provide “good value to students and families, offering quality education and training that prepares graduates to obtain employment and repay their loans.”

President's CornerDear Colleagues,

President Barack Obama recently announced his Blueprint for Keeping College Affordable and Within Reach for All Americans. While I have some concern that the plan risks ignoring the great range of contributions colleges and universities make to students’ lives, I share President Obama’s conviction that we must provide “good value to students and families, offering quality education and training that prepares graduates to obtain employment and repay their loans.”

Pace has a powerful answer to this call. We are a leader in providing an education of lasting value and preparing graduates to succeed in their professions and in their lives. On the subject of employment and loans, two examples illustrate a compelling cause and effect: the job placement rate of Pace students upon graduation is currently 12 percent higher than the national average, and, because of their strong earning power, Pace alumni have a loan default rate of just 2.4 percent, far below that of any other university in the New York Metropolitan Area.

The value we provide our students does not begin at graduation, of course. In addition to the measurable—and immeasurable—contributions that faculty make in students’ lives every day, the University has made an institutional commitment to keeping a Pace education within reach for outstanding students from every background. Last year, we provided $120 million in financial aid to students and their families—the largest non-salary expense item in our budget. During the past several years, we have worked diligently to keep tuition increases as low as possible while substantially increasing the amount of financial aid we offer.

In the coming weeks and months you will hear me talk more about the high value proposition of a Pace education and the critical contributions we can make to the future of the nation through our potent combination of the liberal arts and education for the professions. Now is truly a time for Pace.

Sincerely yours,

Stephen J. Friedman
President

President’s Corner

Many of the new initiatives here at Pace–both academically and administratively–involve calculated risk. We’re actively recruiting students in new markets, embarking on new programs to retain students, expanding our online and blended courses, revamping the Pleasantville and New York City campuses, and engaging alumni in new ways.

President's CornerDear Colleagues,

Let me begin by wishing everyone a happy and healthy new year. I just returned from a trip to Burma, a country whose journey from isolation has begun in earnest. It is clear that the pro-democracy movement has taken hold and for the first time in many years, there is hope for reform.

What will it take for change in Burma? Nobel Peace Laureate and democracy advocate Aun San Suu Kyi said it best: “We have to be prepared to take risks.”

What will it take for continued change at Pace? As the New Year unfolds, I challenge each and every one of you to take a fresh look at the goals you’ve established for your department and for yourself, and to start thinking about taking some risk–not for the sake of risk, but for the sake of progress.

Many of the new initiatives here at Pace–both academically and administratively–involve calculated risk. We’re actively recruiting students in new markets, embarking on new programs to retain students, expanding our online and blended courses, revamping the Pleasantville and New York City campuses, and engaging alumni in new ways. Last week, we hosted the Summit on Resilience, bringing together nearly 300 leaders from the public and private sectors to examine effective disaster relief planning and response. Demonstrating Pace’s convening power, the conference attracted national and international figures, such as Margareta Wahlström, Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Disaster Risk Reduction, Tom Ridge, the first Secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, and Ivan Seidenberg, Pace Trustee and retired CEO and Chairman of the Board of Verizon Communications. Hosting such a high-profile event might be considered a risk, but it was one well worth taking because the Pace Community has important leadership to offer in the area of national security. Take a look at the video from the conference.

Taking a risk can be scary, but it can be very rewarding. Intelligent risk-taking is valued and encouraged at Pace. What risks are you prepared to take this year?

Sincerely yours,

Stephen J. Friedman
President

President’s Corner

There are very few other places in the world that offer the professional, cultural, and intellectual milieu of New York. That is why we immerse our students in all that New York has to offer. And we put forth the effort to bring some of these “only in New York” experiences on campus.

President's CornerDear Colleagues,

Location.  Location.  Location. Our locations in New York City and Westchester are a huge advantage in recruiting and retaining students.  There are very few other places in the world that offer the professional, cultural, and intellectual milieu of New York.

That is why we immerse our students in all that New York has to offer, and we put forth the effort to bring some of these “only in New York” experiences on campus. We are increasingly capitalizing on our location to give our students a unique educational experience, one they couldn’t get just anywhere.

This month, the Pace Community and our friends and neighbors in Lower Manhattan will have the opportunity to hear  legendary investor Mario Gabelli share his views on navigating the rough seas of our global economy. In the world of investing, Gabelli is one of the most insightful. Here is your chance to get the inside track on the disappointing recovery since the financial crisis in mid-2009, the persistently high number of unemployed, and what he sees as areas for optimism. Please join me for this very compelling only-in-New York discussion on Tuesday, December 13.

Just after the New Year on January 11, former Secretary of Homeland Security Tom Ridge and Margareta Wahlström, Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Disaster Risk Reduction, United Nations will give the keynote addresses at the Summit on Resilience here at the Schimmel. This one-day Summit brings together leaders in the public and private sectors for  challenging discussions on how  government and corporations must work together to address issues of resilience and recovery should the United States face another terrorist attack or natural disaster. This Summit is open to all Pace students, faculty, and staff.  Again, an “only in New York” experience.

Last but not least, I’d like to say congratulations and thank you. Four small, but heartfelt words from me to all of you as the semester winds down. Thank you for putting in the extra effort and for keeping the education and welfare of our students at the forefront of everything you do.

I wish you and your families a very joyous holiday season.

Sincerely yours,

Stephen J. Friedman
President

President’s Corner

We have announced master plans for both the New York City and Westchester campuses that entail a number of exciting changes that will enhance the quality of the campus experience. An integral component of those plans are changes to the University’s athletic and recreational facilities that will create a lasting impact on what athletics mean to the Pace Community.

President's CornerDear Colleagues:

Last month’s Homecoming football game and pep rally reminded us how important athletics are to the Pace Community.

College athletics are about more than just competition—they also encourage healthy minds and futures. Pace athletes excel both on and off the field with an average GPA of 3.10 and an 86 percent retention rate. They develop important teamwork and leadership skills that are critical to success in the classroom, in professional settings, and in life. Our athletes also give back to the community that supports them. Currently, Pace’s student athletes participate in a wide variety of community service activities throughout the school year, including volunteering at local schools and retirement homes and raising funds for charitable events such as the Susan G. Komen Walk, Relay for Life, the Special Olympics, and many more. But most important, college athletics encourage the entire community to come together and show our spirit and pride.

We have announced master plans for both the New York City and Westchester campuses that entail a number of exciting changes that will enhance the quality of the campus experience. An integral component of those plans are changes to the University’s athletic and recreational facilities that will create a lasting impact on what athletics mean to the Pace Community. Just a few of the improvements we envision for the future of athletics at Pace include a new multipurpose field with artificial turf for football, soccer, and lacrosse with a track; updates to the existing baseball field; a new softball field; and a new field house and concession stands. For a full list of improvements included in the master plans for Westchester, please click here.

I encourage you all to attend a game to see the Setters in action. Our student athletes show their Pace pride every day—let’s show our pride in them.

Sincerely yours,

Stephen J. Friedman
President

President’s Corner

October is always an exciting month as we gear up for Homecoming celebrations on both the New York City and Pleasantville campuses. The events on both campuses promise to be fun and filled with Pace spirit.

President's CornerDear Colleagues:

October is always an exciting month as we gear up for Homecoming celebrations on both the New York City and Pleasantville campuses. The events on both campuses promise to be fun and filled with Pace spirit.

For me, the best part of Homecoming is the coming together of students, parents, faculty, staff, and alumni to celebrate Pace as both a community and as an institution. Pace has transformed the lives of so many people in our 105 year history; our community is proud, loyal, and committed to the future of this wonderful university.

I encourage all faculty and staff to take part in the festivities, from the annual Jazz brunch in New York on October 15, to the football game and community dinner in Pleasantville on October 22.  This is yet another opportunity – like Convocation and Commencement – to feel the impact of what we do every day, whether we work directly or indirectly with our students.  I hope to see all of you at one event or another.

I’d also like to invite you to attend this month’s InsideTrack on October 25 for what promises to be an engaging discussion with Richard Foster, formerly a senior partner at McKinsey and now at the Yale School of Management and best-selling author of The Attacker’s Advantage and Creative Destruction. Dick is a dynamic speaker.  The discussion will focus on the sources of innovation in America and the lessons for the Chinese economy.  I have no doubt that it will be both educational and enlightening. To reserve your seat, please visit www.pace.edu/insidetrack.

Sincerely yours,

Stephen J. Friedman
President

President’s Corner

Our university has the enormous responsibility of preparing our students for the new global realities. As we continue our quest for growing academic excellence, the faculty is the spear point for inspiring our students to reach their fullest potential.

President's CornerDear Colleagues,

Faculty renewal is critical to the health and well-being of our university. In the past three years, Pace has hired 54 new faculty in positions throughout the university. I am delighted that 17 new faculty members have begun teaching this fall. (See the list of new faculty in this issue of Opportunitas.) Given the state of the general economy, this is an impressive record and reflects our university-wide commitment to the quality of our academic programs.

A faculty with diverse backgrounds is important to our success in educating students to be thinking professionals. Composed of tenure track, clinical and adjunct professors, our faculty balances academic and professional experience to give our students the benefit of both theoretical and practical learning. The diversity in gender, ethnicity, and culture also enables our students to see the world and the subject matter of academic disciplines from differing perspectives.

Our university has the enormous responsibility of preparing our students for the new global realities. As we continue our quest for growing academic excellence, the faculty is the spear point for inspiring our students to reach their fullest potential.

I wish you all a very happy and productive fall 2011.

Sincerely yours,

Stephen J. Friedman
President

President’s Corner

I want to invite you all to join me at InsideTrack with filmmaker Jim Whitaker and a special screening of his documentary, Rebirth. Also coming up this fall, the University’s plans to mark the 10th anniversary of 9/11.

President's CornerDear Colleagues,

Whether you were a member of the Pace Community on September 11, 2001, or joined us after that time, you likely know that we felt the impact of 9/11 in a very profound way. We lost 44 members of our Pace Community. Our New York City Campus was closed for nearly two weeks. We came together to ensure the safety of our students, faculty, and staff, and to help meet the physical and emotional needs of those coping with intense grief.

While time has helped heal our wounds, we will never forget 9/11’s impact on Pace, on our country, or on the world. The 10th anniversary of 9/11 is upon us. We will mark the occasion in several ways.

InsideTrack on July 19

On Tuesday, July 19 InsideTrack returns to the Schimmel Theater with a special screening of the extraordinary new documentary Rebirth in advance of its release in theaters this August. Rebirth chronicles the rebuilding of the World Trade Center site and the lives of five people who were deeply affected. Reserve your seats by clicking here and please bring family and friends to see this moving film. I expect we will have a large turnout from the Pace Community and from our neighbors in Lower Manhattan.

Immediately following the film, Jim Whitaker, visionary Hollywood director of Rebirth and Pace honorary degree recipient this year, and I will reflect on the film and the profound effects of 9/11 on the American psyche over the past 10 years. It will be an engaging conversation, and no doubt one of many such thought-provoking conversations on the subject in the months to come.

September 11 Events at Pace
On Thursday, September 8, Pace, in partnership with the National Press Photographers Association, will host “Witness to Tragedy and Recovery,” an exhibit of haunting photographs from the 9/11 tragedy and a symposium hosted by former CNN news anchor Aaron Brown. On Friday, September 9, a conference for first-responders will be held at Pace, along with a symposium for downtown scholars on ethical thinking hosted by our own professor of philosophy Ilan Safit, PhD.

We are planning a memorial service on the afternoon of Saturday, September 10, a community viewing of memorial events in the Schimmel Theater, and a student vigil on Sunday, September 11. Following the events of the weekend, the public launch of the eagerly anticipated Pace University 9/11 Oral History Project, a fascinating compilation of stories by Maria Iacullo-Bird, PhD, and her students in the years immediately following 9/11, is scheduled for Monday, September 12.

More information on all of these events will be forthcoming shortly. While the first week of the new academic year is always a busy one, please take the time to reflect on the events of 9/11 and the years since. The Pace Community is here for you, as always, as a source of strength and support.

Sincerely yours,

Stephen J. Friedman
President